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New York metropolitan area

From Academic Kids

fr:Grand New York
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New_York_urban_area.gif
This map shows in dark green the urban area of New York City

The metropolitan area of New York City, also called Greater New York or Greater New York City is defined by the U.S. Census as the New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-CT Metropolitan Statistical Area based on broad social and economic integration, which is divided into four Metropolitan Divisions. The Census also defines a wider New York-Newark-Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT Combined Statistical Area based more specifically on commuting patterns.

The total population of the New York Metropolitan Area is 21,199,865 (as of 2000). It is the single largest metropolitan area in America and has grown generally quickly, growing 9.4% since the 1990 census.

The metropolitan area includes New York City, most of northern New Jersey, nine counties in New York State, southwestern Connecticut, and a small part of Pennsylvania which is not in the New York City area itself. North Western New Jersey, New York State and PA are in an area known as the tri-state because the three states meet at that PA county. This is the only reason for PA to (sometimes) be included in a non-local, broader definiton of the NYC area, usually from those outside of the Tri-State (NY,NJ & CT) area.

The New York City Tri-State area is centered around New York City and includes those areas within a half to one hour commute. This is roughly the same as any city's metro are in any given state, but the east cost and NYC geography as well as its enormous size makes NJ and CT a part of the NYC metro area with New York City as its main hub.

As with other metropolitan areas, the actual definition is nowhere near as exact.

Greater New York is actually based on two urban cores: New York City and Newark (Hudson and Essex county, NJ). New York City's near suburbs are Long Island and Westchester, while Newark suburbs are Bergen, Passaic and Morris county. Surrounding these counties are the outer suburbs, or peripherical counties.

Contents

Populations of counties and cities within the metropolis

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New_York_area.PNG
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area
New York-Wayne-White Plains, NY-NJ Metropolitan Division
Nassau-Suffolk, NY Metropolitan Division
Newark-Union, NJ-PA Metropolitan Division
Edison, NJ Metropolitan Division
Rest of the New York-Newark-Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT Combined Statistical Area


New York and Pennsylvania

New Jersey

Connecticut

New York, NY PMSA

The New York, NY Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (PMSA) is comprised of the five boroughs of New York City, Long Island, and Westchester, Rockland, and Putnam Counties. It is smaller than the CMSA; it is only made up of the core city and immediately adjacent suburban counties. Its total population is 12,068,148.

Other Cities

While the New York Metropolitan Area itself is so large, many cities have formed in it, a total of at least 12 towns in the area have a population greater than 100,000, they are:

Ethnic Diversity

New York City, as well as it's surburbs, have always been known for being very ethnically diverse areas, traditionally, the New York Are boasts high percentages of Italians, Irish, German, Polish, and Jewish populations, and the leading religion in this area is Roman Catholic. African-Americans also have always held strong presence in New York City as well as subrubs Newark, New Jersey and Bridgeport, Connecticut.

With recent immigration, however, the areas diversity has only grown. The states of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut are all ranked among the top 10 fastest growing immigration states in America, now with heavy Hispanic (particuarly Cuban, Dominican, and Puerto Rican) and Asian (paricuarly Chinese and Indian American) minorities.

Local Politics

Like most major cities, New York City's politics are largely liberal and in favor of the Democratic Party, but unlike some metro areas, New York City's suburbs are mostly liberal and in favor of Democrats as well. These areas include the suburban areas of Brooklyn, Queens, and the closest New Jersey areas to NYC, such as Jersey City. However, there are Republican suburbs to be found in the area. One borough of New York City proper, Staten Island, tends to lean Republican. On the edges of the metro area, such as all western New Jersey counties in the area except Mercer, Pike County (Pennsylvania), Litchfield County (Connecticut), and the New York state counties north of West Chester, voters also tend to be more conservative.

Overall, Greater New York's voters voted for John Kerry, by 59.20% (4,772,314) to 39.67% (3,197,970) for George W. Bush in 2004. In details, New York City voters overwhelmingly favored Kerry by 75% (1,828,015) to 24% (587,534) for the incubent, while suburban voters gave only a slim margin to the Democratic candidate, with 52.36% (2,944,299) of the vote for Kerry, to 46.42% (2,610,436) for the President. This can be explained by the importance that moderate communting suburban voters gave to the Security and Terrorism issue, where Bush was found more credible than Kerry in polls.

Life In The New York Area

The New York City area is notoriously multifarious, while the city itself has some bad areas, and some of the inner metropolitan cities have bad reputations, overall, the New York Metro Area is one of the safest areas to live in. Long Island, New York was rated the safest place to live per-capita in 2005, followed by Middlesex and Monmouth counties in New Jersey

The New York Metro Area also the most expensive place to live in the United States, the city itself being the most costly, with many of its suburbs closely behind.

Despite this, many families live in the cities suburbs and commute to jobs in the city, while New York schools, particuarly inner-city, are known for being unsatisfactory, New Jersey and Connecticut both boast very effective school districts and lower costs of living than the city.

While the suburbs are more populated by middle-class families, the city of New York is home to many younger people, called "yuppies", who are originally from the suburbs who want to expierience city life. Generally, immigrant families live in the city, and move to the suburbs when they make enough money.

People from outiside of the New York Area tend to think of it as a dangerous foreign land, as people are very fast paced, and traffic being a major problem, as well as many people being packed into one place. This is partially true, but not completly.

Source: [1] (http://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/phc-t3.html), Table 1.

See also: United States metropolitan area


Flag of New York

State of New York

Capital:

Albany

Regions:

Adirondack Mountains | Capital District | Catskill Mountains | Central | Finger Lakes | The Holland Purchase | Hudson Valley | Long Island | Mohawk Valley | Shawangunks | Southern Tier | Upstate | Western

Major metros:

Albany | Binghamton | Buffalo | New York | Rochester | Syracuse | Utica

Smaller cities:

Amsterdam | Auburn | Batavia | Canandaigua | Corning | Cortland | Dunkirk | Elmira | Geneva | Glen Cove | Glens Falls | Gloversville | Goshen | Hornell | Hudson | Ilion | Ithaca | Jamestown | Kingston | Lockport | Malone | Massena | Middletown | New Paltz | Newark | Ogdensburg | Olean | Oneida | Oneonta | Oswego | Plattsburgh | Port Jervis | Poughkeepsie | Riverhead | Rome | Saratoga Springs | Warwick | Watertown

Counties:

Albany | Allegany | Bronx | Broome | Cattaraugus | Cayuga | Chautauqua | Chemung | Chenango | Clinton | Columbia | Cortland | Delaware | Dutchess | Erie | Essex | Franklin | Fulton | Genesee | Greene | Hamilton | Herkimer | Jefferson | Kings (Brooklyn) | Lewis | Livingston | Madison | Monroe | Montgomery | Nassau | New York (Manhattan) | Niagara | Oneida | Onondaga | Ontario | Orange | Orleans | Oswego | Otsego | Putnam | Queens | Rensselaer | Richmond (Staten Island) | Rockland | Saint Lawrence | Saratoga | Schenectady | Schoharie | Schuyler | Seneca | Steuben | Suffolk | Sullivan | Tioga | Tompkins | Ulster | Warren | Washington | Wayne | Westchester | Wyoming | Yates

Regions of New Jersey Flag of New Jersey
Jersey Shore | Meadowlands | North Jersey | Pine Barrens | South Jersey | New York metropolitan area | Delaware Valley
Largest cities

Atlantic City | Bayonne | Camden | Clifton | East Orange | Elizabeth | Hackensack | Hoboken | Jersey City | Linden | Long Branch | New Brunswick | Newark | Passaic | Paterson | Perth Amboy | Plainfield | Trenton | Union City | Vineland

Counties of New Jersey

Atlantic | Bergen | Burlington | Camden | Cape May | Cumberland | Essex | Gloucester | Hudson | Hunterdon | Mercer | Middlesex | Monmouth | Morris | Ocean | Passaic | Salem | Somerset | Sussex | Union | Warren


Flag of Connecticut

State of Connecticut

Capital:

Hartford

Regions:

Greater New Haven | Greater Hartford | Litchfield Hills | Lower Connecticut River Valley | Naugatuck River Valley | New York metropolitan area/Gold Coast | Quiet Corner | Southeastern Connecticut

Largest cities:

Ansonia | Bridgeport | Bristol | Danbury | Fairfield | Greenwich | Groton | Hartford | Meriden | Middletown | Milford | Naugatuck | New Britain | New Haven | New London | North Haven | Norwalk | Norwich | Shelton | Stamford | Torrington | Waterbury | West Hartford

Counties:

Fairfield | Hartford | Litchfield | Middlesex | New Haven | New London | Tolland | Windham


Regions of Pennsylvania Flag of Pennsylvania
Coal Region | Lehigh Valley | Northern Tier | Northwest Region | Pennsylvania Dutch Country | Laurel Highlands | The Poconos | Susquehanna Valley
Largest cities
Allentown | Altoona | Bethel Park | Bethlehem | Chester | Erie | Harrisburg | Lancaster | Levittown | Mount Lebanon | New Cumberland | Norristown | Penn Hills | Philadelphia | Pittsburgh | Reading | Scranton | State College | Wilkes-Barre
Counties
Adams | Allegheny |Armstrong | Beaver | Bedford | Berks | Blair | Bradford | Bucks | Butler | Cambria | Cameron | Carbon | Centre | Chester | Clarion | Clearfield | Clinton | Columbia | Crawford | Cumberland | Dauphin | Delaware | Elk | Erie | Fayette | Forest | Franklin | Fulton | Greene | Huntingdon | Indiana | Jefferson | Juniata | Lackawanna | Lancaster | Lawrence | Lebanon | Lehigh | Luzerne | Lycoming | McKean | Mercer | Mifflin | Monroe | Montgomery | Montour | Northampton | Northumberland | Perry | Philadelphia | Pike | Potter | Schuylkill | Snyder | Somerset | Sullivan | Susquehanna | Tioga | Union | Venango | Warren | Washington | Wayne | Westmoreland | Wyoming | York

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