Professional wrestling throws

From Academic Kids

Much of the action in professional wrestling involves the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him/her down. These moves are generally illegal in traditional amateur wrestling because they can cause serious injury. They are sometimes also called "power moves", as they are meant to emphasize a wrestler's strength.

There is a wide variety of slams and throws in pro wrestling. Many moves are known by several different names. Professional wrestlers frequently give their "finisher" (signature moves that usually result in a win) new names. Occasionally these names become popular and are used regardless of the wrestler performing the technique: one example is the tombstone piledriver, a term originally used for The Undertaker's finisher but now used to refer to any belly-to-belly piledriver.

Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible.

Contents

Armbar takedown

This is a technique in which the attacker grabs the opponent's arm and pulls him/her down to the ground by wrenching down the victim's arm, and is also known as a Single Arm DDT.

The affected area for this hold is the shoulder, not the head like normal DDT's, the attacker would grab the victim's arm and bars it in front of the attacker's body so that the attacker is holding out the arm with the arm furthest away from the victim's body, then the attacker would reach over the victim's shoulder and wrap it around his/her victim's arm with the other, The attacker then drops down and drives the victim's shoulder into the mat.

This hold is noted as the move that broke "Pitbull #1" Gary Wolfe's neck, this happened because Wolfe took the bump wrong and landed on his head and not his shoulder.

Armbreaker

A armbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's arm against a part of the wrestler's body.

Arm drag

A move in which the wrestler uses his/her opponent's momentum against him/her by hooking his/her arm and flipping him/her over onto the mat. The move was popularized by Ricky "The Dragon" Steamboat who had the best arm drags in professional wrestling.

Over-the-shoulder arm drag

Also called a shoulder throw or ipponzei. The wrestler grabs his/her opponent's arm, then turns to face the other direction and pulls the victim over his/her shoulder. It is essentially the same as the ippon seoi-nage found in Judo.

Arm wringer

An Arm Wringer or Spinning Wristlock is a move in which the attacker grabs the opponent's arm by the wrist/arm and twists it over the attacker's head to spin it around with enough force to take the victim to the mat.

Atomic Drop

A move in which the wrestler goes behind an opponent puts his/her head under the victim's shoulder and lifts his/her opponent up and then drops him/her tailbone-first on the wrestler's knee.

Inverted Atomic Drop

A move in which the wrestler puts his/her head under the victim's shoulder and lifts his/her opponent up and then drops him/her "lower abdomen region" first on the wrestler's knee. This is also known as a Manhattan Drop.

Backbreaker

A back breaker is any move in which the wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and jumps or drops his/her opponent so that the opponent's back impacts or is bent backwards against a part of the wrestler's body.

Backbreaker Drop

A move in which a wrestler lifts an opponent up on to his/her shoulder and drops down to his/her knee so that the opponent's back is bent backwards against his/her shoulder. Former WWE wrestler A-Train used this move as his finisher and called it the "Train Wreck."

Belly to Back Backbreaker

The attacker stands behind his/her opponent and puts his/her head under the arm of the victim as for a Back Drop, but raises a knee and brings the victim back down so the opponent's back collides with the knee of the attacker.

Double Underhook Backbreaker

The attacker stands facing a bent over opponent and hooks his/her arms. The attacker then lifts the victim as for a Tiger Driver, but raises a knee and brings the victim back down so his/her back collides with the knee of the attacker.

Pendulum Backbreaker

This basic back breaker involves a wrestler standing side-to-side and slightly behind, with the victim facing in the same direction, then reaching around the victim's torso with one arm across the victim's chest and under both arms and places the other arm under the victim's legs. The wrestler then lifts the victim up, bringing his/her legs off the ground, and dropping him/her back-first against the wrestler's knee.

Sitout Backbreaker

The attacker places the victim in an Argentine backbreaker rack with the victim facing upward while the attacker is standing up. Then the attacker drops to end the move.

This move was invented by Abyss who calls it the "Shock Treatment".

Back body drop

A back body drop, backdrop, is a move in which a wrestler bends forward or crouches in front of his/her opponent, grabs hold of his/her opponent, and stands up, lifting the victim up and over and dropping him/her behind the back. It is applied frequently against a charging opponent.

In Japan, a backdrop is the term for what is called a belly-to-back suplex in America.

Body slam

A body slam is any move in which a wrestler picks up their opponent and throws them down to the ground.

Alabama slam

Also known as a Water-Wheel Slam. This move involves a wrestler placing their er head between an opponent's knees, then standing up, holding onto their opponent's legs, so that the opponent is facing the wrestler's back. The wrestler then simply brings both hands down, throwing the opponent back-first to the mat. Hardcore Holly uses the Alabama Slam as his finisher.

Biel throw

The wrestler stands to the side of their opponent, grabs them, and throws them forward, causing them to flip over onto their back. It is considered a very basic technique, so basic that a forward rolling fall is commonly called a biel bump, and is mainly used by very large wrestlers to emphasize power and strength over finesse.

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The Undertaker chokeslamming JBL

Chokeslam

A chokeslam is any body slam in which the wrestler grasps their opponent's neck, lifts them up, and slams them to the mat back-first. It is very common in televised wrestling because it is simple and relatively safe yet looks powerful on camera.

The most common variety of chokeslam is performed with a single-handed choke. The wrestler places their free hand behind the victim's back to help turn them horizontally for the throw. A two-handed choke variation on two victims or one is also popular.

Notable users include: The Big Show, Kane, The Undertaker, and Akira Taue.

Reverse chokeslam

The attacker grabs hold of the opponent's neck with both hands, neck with one, and throat with the other. The attacker then lifts the opponent up, releases the hand holding the opponent's throat, and pushes forward and slams the opponent to the mat face first with the other hand.

Notable users include: Takeshi Morishima (Amaze Impact)

Fireman's carry slam

A wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a firemans carry position then the attacking wrestler then takes hold of the thigh and arm of the opponent, which are hung over the front side of the attacker, they then leans forward and pulls the vitim over their head and shoulders slamming the victim down on their back in front of the attacker.

A Rolling Fireman's Carry Slam is a variation that sees the attacker keep hold of the opponent and run forward before slamming the victim to the ground and using the momentum to roll over the opponent. This variation was used by William Regal, who called it the Regal Roll.

Fallaway slam

Also known as a Table Top Suplex. The wrestler, while standing in front of an opponent would reaches between their opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their other arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler's body then falls backward throwing the victim over their head down to the mat back-first. This slam can be either bridged into a pin, or the attacker can float over into another fallaway slam.

Scott Hall used this as one of his signature moves. A slightly modified version of this move is used by Bradshaw, who referred to it before (while on APA) as the Last Call.

Full nelson slam

In this move the aggressor places their opponent in a full nelson hold and uses it to lift them off the ground. Once in the air, the aggressor removes one of their arms (so their opponent is now in a half nelson) and slams them down to the mat.

This is a signature move of Hardcore Holly

Sitout full nelson slam

The attacker places the victim in a full nelson. The attacker then lifts the victim into the air, maintaining the hold. The attacker then drops to a sitting position, driving the lower spine of the victim into the ground.

Bubba Ray Dudley uses this move, calling it the Bubba Bomb

Gorilla press slam

The wrestler lifts their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended (as in the military press used in weight lifting), then slams the victim down on his/her back. Often the attacker will falls to a sitting position, slamming the victim down on their back. This version is similar to the Michinoku Driver II used by Taka Michinoku and is referred to as a Gorilla Press Bomb.

This is also one of Goldberg's signature moves.

Gorilla press drop

The wrestler lifts their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended then drops the victim down face-first in front or back. It is a popular technique for very large wrestlers because it emphasizes their height and power.

As used to great effect by The Ultimate Warrior with his Gorilla Press/Big Splash combination

Half nelson slam

The attacker stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the victim. The attacker reaches under one of the victim's arms with their corresponding arm and places the palm of their hand on the neck of the victim, thereby forcing the arm of the victim up into the air (the half nelson). The attacker then lifts the victim up turns and falls forward slamming the victim into the mat.

This move is used by Val Venis.

Olympic slam

An attacking wrestler places their head under an opponent's arm, and lifts up an opponent so that they are face-up across the attacker's shoulders. Then the wrestler falls backwards forcing the opponent to the mat back-first.

This move has also been discribed as a spinning back drop (belly-to-back suplex) and a signature move of Kurt Angle (Angle named the move the Olympic Slam but now refers to it as the Angle Slam)

Pumphandle slam

The wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the victim's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked. The attacker then lifts their opponent up over their shoulder and falls forward to slam the victim against the mat back-first.

Another version of the Pumphandle Slam sees the wrestler drop the victim to the Sidewalk Slam (Side Slam) position. This version is referred to as a Pumphandle Side Slam and is the signature move of Gene Snitsky.

Samoan Drop

The wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position then the wrestler falls backwards dropping the victim to the mat and is mainly performed on charging opponents. It has been a signature move for Samoan wrestlers throughout the years, including The Rock and Rikishi.

Scoop slam

Facing their opponent, the wrestler reaches between their opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their er other arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up and turns them upside down so that they are held up by the attacker's arm cradling their back. The attacker then throws the victim to the ground so that they land on their back.

Spinebuster slam

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Batista delivers a Spinebuster to Triple H

This is also known simply as a Spinebuster. The wrestler starts facing their opponent. They then grab the opponent around the waist and lift them up. They then turn 180°, at the same time turning the victim into a horizontal position across the chest, and toss them forward onto their back. It is usually performed against a charging opponent, using the victim's own momentum to power the throw.

Another version of this sees the wrestler elevate the charging opponent up, and without spinning, slamming the victim down to the mat.

Most famously used by Arn Anderson, this move has since been used by The Rock, HHH, Ron Simmons aka Faarooq, and more recently by Batista in the WWE.

Bulldog

A bulldog, or bulldogging headlock, is any move in which the wrestler grabs an opponent's head or applies a head lock or face lock to his/her opponent and jumps forward, so that the attacker lands in a sitting position, driving the victim's face into the mat.

Cobra Clutch Bulldog

The attacker applies a Cobra Clutch and then leaps forward, falling into a sitting position and driving the face of the victim into the ground.

Three-quarter Facelock Bulldog

A Three-quarter Facelock Bulldog is a move that mostly sees an attacker applying a Three-quarter Facelock then drop to the floor driving the opponent's face into the mat. This version has been previously used by Johnny Ace, who called it the Ace Crusher and Diamond Dallas Page, who called it the Diamond Cutter. Currently this move is being used by Randy Orton and, who calls it the R.K.O. and Homicide. Matt Hardy and Jeff Hardy also have a variation of a Three-quarter Facelock Bulldog called the Twist of Fate, in which a half-grapple is twisted into the Three-Quarter facelock.

Back suplex into Three-quarter Facelock Bulldog

The attacker lifts the victim from behind as with a Belly to back suplex, but, instead of falling backwards, pushes the victim's legs so that the victim spins in the air and finishes face down and parallel to the ground. As the victim falls, the attacker reaches back and seizes his/her head in a Three-quarter Facelock, driving the face of the victim into the ground with increased force.

TKO

The Total Knock Out (TKO) is a Fireman's carry into a Three-quarter Facelock Bulldog (see above). This variant has been used by Marc Mero, Roadkill, Mike Awesome, and Jerry Lynn.

Rolling Three-quarter Facelock Bulldog

This is when a Front Facelock or an Inverted facelock is rolled in to a three-quarter facelock bulldog.

This move has two major variants: one in which the attacker uses an inverted facelock and rolls under his/her opponent, and one in which he/she uses a front facelock and rolls over. The former has been widely referred to as the Last Rites in indy promotions due to its use by Christopher Daniels; in the WWE, Test used this move and referred to it as a Test Drive. Another version spins the opposite way, aka the Roll of the Dice as named by Reno. The Roll of the Dice has been used by wrestlers such as Bill DeMott and Luther Reigns who have each referred to it with different names.

Brainbuster

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A brainbuster

A brainbuster also known as a Avalanche Suplex is a move in which a wrestler puts his/her opponent in a front facelock, hooks his/her tights, and lifts him/her up as if he/she was performing a vertical suplex. The wrestler then jumps up and falls onto his/her back so that the victim lands on his/her head while remaining vertical.

Known as Vertical Brainbuster in Japan, while Brainbuster refers to a Vertical suplex in Japan.

There is a controversy whether this move should be classified as a suplex or a high lifting DDT.

Fisherman brainbuster

A Fisherman Brainbuster a variation of the brainbuster in which the wrestler will also hook the victim's near leg with his/her free arm to aid in lifting him/her off the ground. The wrestler then jumps up and falls down on his/her back, slamming his/her opponent down to the mat headfirst.

This move was used by Jazz as a finisher.

Inverted brainbuster

The attacker begins behind and facing a standing victim. The attacker then pulls the head of the victim back and applies an inverted facelock to the victim with one arm. The attacker then places his/her other arm under the lower back of the victim, then uses that arm to elevate the victim until they are vertical. The attacker then jumps up and falls down on his/her back, driving the head of the victim to the mat.

Muscle Buster

Also known as a Double fisherman brainbuster.

The attacker faces a bent opponent. He hooks both of the opponent's legs with his arms and tucks his head next to the opponents. He then stands, lifing the opponent up, so that opponent is upside down with his head resting on the attackers shoulder. The attacker then jumps up and falls down on his back, driving the opponent shoulders first to down the mat. The opponent's neck impacts the attacker's shoulder. The attacker usually begins this move with the opponent is sitting on an elevated position, usually a top turnbuckle, because it's easier to hook and lift the opponent when he is positioned higher than the attacker.

Notable users include: Samoa Joe, Daisuke Ikeda and Mohammed Yone.

Scoop brainbuster

Also known as Northern Lights Bomb.

The attacker puts the opponent in a front facelock, scoops one the opponents thighs with his free hand, lifts him/her upside down, then drops to his/her side or back, driving the victim to the mat on his/her neck and shoulders.

Notable users of this move include Kensuke Sasaki, Genichiro Tenryu, and Al Snow.

Catapult

A Catapult or Slingshot Catapult is a throw that typically starts with the victim on his/her back, and the attacker standing and facing him. The attacker hooks each of the victim's legs in one of his/her arms then falls backwards to slingshot the opponent into a turnbuckles, ladders, ropes etc.

DDT

Similar to a bulldog, a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive the victim's head into the mat. The classic DDT is performed by putting the victim in a front facelock and falling backwards so that the victim is forced to dive forward onto his/her head.

Death Valley driver

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John Cena setting up Brock Lesnar for the F.U

Often abbreviated to D.V.D. Known as Death Valley Bomb in Japan. This is a move in which a brainbuster-type slam is performed from a fireman's carry. The attacker falls in the direction that the victim's head is facing, driving the victim's head into the mat.

Tommy Dreamer's Death Valley Driver has already been credited as one of the best Death Valley Drivers ever executed. Perry Saturn also has an effective Death Valley Driver.

The F.U. finisher of WWE wrestler John Cena is a slight variation of this move, except that the victim's back is impacted first. It is essentially a side fireman's carry slam.

Inverted death valley driver

Also known as a Burning Hammer, or inverted D.V.D.. The move is executed from a Argentine backbreaker rack (face up, with the neck and one leg cradled) position. The attacker falls sideways, driving the victim's head into the mat.

This is an extremely dangerous move as the opponent's body cannot roll with the natural momentum of the move to absorb the impact.

The Burning Hammer name was invented by Japanese professional wrestler Kenta Kobashi who uses it as one of his finishers.

Driver

A Driver is a variation of many moves that involves an opponent being driven down between the legs of an attacker (who is dropping to a seated position) on the back of his/her neck/shoulder area.

Blue Thunder Driver

See Spin-out powerbomb.

Fisherman Driver

A Fisherman Driver a variation of a brainbuster in which the wrestler will also hook the victim's near leg with his/her free arm to aid in lifting him/her off the ground. The wrestler then drops to a sit-out position landing the victim between his/her legs, driving them down to the mat on the back of their neck/sholder area.

Most notably the driver version is used by Low Ki as a finisher; and also by Shane Douglas who called it the Pittsburgh Plunge.

Michinoku Driver II

Also known as a sit-out scoop slam but is named after its inventor Taka Michinoku. While facing his/her opponent, the wrestler reaches between his/her opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around his/her back from the same side with his/her other arm. The wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and turns him/her upside down so that he/she is held up by the attacker's arm cradling his/her back. The attacker then throws the victim to the ground as he/she falls to a sitting position so that the victim lands on his/her upper back. This is often just called a Michinoku Driver because TAKA rarely uses the original Michinoku Driver--a double underhook implant DDT. Juventud Guerrera also used this move, calling it the "Juvi Driver."

Samoan Driver

A wrestler drapes an opponent over his/her shoulders in a fireman's carry position then the wrestler then takes hold of the opponent and pulls him/her over the attacker's shoulder and down to the ground as he/she falls to a sitting position so that the victim lands on his/her upper back and neck between the legs of the attacker facing towards him/her.

Another way to discribe this move is as a Sit-out version of a Death Valley Driver.

A slight variation of this move is used by Chris Sabin and is called the Cradle Shock.

The Samoan Driver is now the second version of the F-U, the finishing maneuver of John Cena.

Tiger Driver

The attacker faces a bent over opponent. The attacker then double underhooks the victim's arms and lifts him/her up, flipping him/her and dropping them on him/her back. The attacker falls to a sitting position, often pinning the victim in the process. This is also known as a sitout double underhook powerbomb.

Mitsuharu Misawa innovated a variation which he called the Tiger Driver '91 (for the year it was invented). In this variation, instead of dropping the victim on his/her back, they are dropped on their neck and shoulders, and the attacker drops to his/her knees.

There is some dispute over the correct name because the move resembles a Powerbomb more than a driver - thus, the move is also known as a Tiger Bomb. However, Tiger Driver is the original and more commonly accepted name. Some consider a double underhook powerbomb where the attacker does not sitout to be a Tiger Bomb, while the sit-out variant is considered the Tiger Driver.

Electric chair drop

The attacker lifts the victim on his/her shoulders in a sitting position, with both facing the same way. Then the attacker falls backwards driving the victim back-first into the mat.

The beginning of the electric chair drop is also the setup for the doomsday device. It was also the setup used by the Steiner Brothers for their bulldog finishing move.

Electric Chair Bomb

The attacker lifts the victim so they are sitting on the shoulders of the attacker, facing in the same direction. The aatacker then quickly falls to a sitting position, slamming the victim face-first to the mat.

Facebreaker

A facebreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's face against a part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee.

Knee Smash

The knee smash is a standard Facbreaker which involves the attacker grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and pulling the opponent's face down, dropping it on to the attacker's knee. Often used by an attacker to stun an opponent and set him/her up for another move.

Facebuster

A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is any move in which the wrestler forces his/her opponent's face down to the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock. if these are used then the move is either a DDT or bulldog variation.

also Inverted Mat Slams are commonly referred to as facbusters.

A standard Facebuster also known as a Jumping facebuster involves the attacker grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and jumping down, forcing the opponent's face into the mat.

Belly-to-back inverted mat slam

From a position in which the victim is bent forward against the wrestler's midsection, the wrestler grabs around his opponent's midsection and lifts so that the victim is held upside down facing in the same direction as the wrestler, the wrestler then hook both the arms of the victim using his legs, and then falls foward planting the opponent's body into the mat face-first.

Best known as Styles Clash as named by AJ Styles, also known as a Crash Landing as named by the late Mike Lockwood who started using the move during his last stint in the WWE. Styles claims to have invented the move while watching his younger brother-in-law attempt to perform a powerbomb.

Gory Bomb

A back-to-back release facebuster a move which is a variation of the Gory Special, Also known as the Gory Buster. Gory Guerrero, the man who this move is named after has a wrestling grandson, Chavo Guerrero, who uses this move as a finisher.

F-5

A move named and made popular by Brock Lesnar, in which the attacker would put his/her victim in a fireman's carry position, then throw the opponent's legs out in front of him/her to spin him/her out while the attacker fell to back to drive the victim's head in to the mat.

The move's name was taken from the Fujita scale, which ranks the intensity of a tornado, with F5 being the strongest.

Currently used by NWA:TNA superstar Trytan, who calls it the "T-3".

Big Show and Matt Morgan in WWE also have used it. Jun Izumida of Pro Wrestling NOAH uses a slight variation of the F-5 called the "Izu Domu."

Forward Russian Legsweep

A move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind the victim, facing in the same direction, and reaches behind the victim's back to hook the opponent's head with his/her other hand extending the victim's near arm, then while hooking the opponent's leg with his/her own leg the wrestler falls forward, pushing the victim forward to the mat face-first.

It is best known as "The Stroke", the finisher of Jeff Jarrett.

Full Nelson Facebuster

The attacker stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the victim. The attacker reaches under the victim's arms with his/her own corresponding arms and places the palms of his/her hands on the neck of the victim, thereby forcing the arms of the victim up into the air (the Full Nelson). The attacker then hooks the victim's near leg and and throws themselves forwards, driving the victim face first into the ground.

Front Facelock Drop

The attacker applies a Front Facelock and then throws their legs out behind them, falling stomach first to the ground and driving the face of the victim into the ground. Similar to a DDT, but targeting the face of the victim rather than the head.

Sitout facebuster

Also known as a sit-down facebuster. A move in which the attacker grabs hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair then jumps down into a sitting position, forcing the opponent's face into the mat. It was used as a finisher by X-Pac, who called it the X Factor.

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Triple H performing the Pedigree

Double underhook facebuster

Instead of holding the opponent's head like most facebusters, a wrestler bends his/her opponent forward, placing the victim's head between the attacker's legs (a standing head scissors), and hooks each of the opponents arms behind his/her back. He/she then drops to his/her knees, forcing the opponent's face into the mat. Triple H uses it as his finisher, and calls it the Pedigree.

A variation of this move is used by CM Punk, who ascends the turnbuckle so he is standing on the top rope, pulls his victim with him and applies the move (as above), then drops to the ground, landing on his knees and driving the victim's face into the ground with increased force. This move is called The Pepsi Plunge.

Inverted double underhook facebuster

The attacker bends the opponent forwards, then stands in front of them and reaches back, hooking both arms of the victim and forcing down the head of the victim. The attacker then drops to a sitting position, driving the face of the victim into the ground. This move is normally executed from behind; the attacker bends over behind the victim, hooks their arms and then quickly stands up while turning around so the victim is in the aforementioned position. This move has been used by Tommy Rogers, who calls it the Tomikaze, and Christian, who calls it the Impaler or the Unprettier.

Lifting double underhook facebuster

This inverted mat slam is performed when a wrestler bends his/her opponent forward, placing the victim's head between the attacker's legs (a standing head scissors), and hooks each of the opponents arms behind his/her back. He/she then pulls back on the opponent's arms lifting him/her up so that the victim is held upside down facing in the same direction as the wrestler, the wrestler then falls forward (or sometimes down to a sitting position) planting the opponent's body into the mat face-first.

This was a popular move of Rob Van Dam, when he wrestled for the ECW promotion. It is also used by Mark Jindrak.

Sitout double underhook facebuster

Also known as a sit-down double underhook facebuster. A move in which instead of holding the opponents head like most facebusters, a wrestler bends his/her opponent forward, placing the victim's head between the attacker's legs (a standing head scissors), and hooks each of the opponents arms behind his/her back, he/she then proceeds to lift the opponent up and jumps down into a sitting position, forcing the opponents face into the mat. It is used as a finisher by Christopher Daniels, who calls it the Angel's Wings, where he spins out while landing the move.

Complete Shot

Well known as an Reverse STO, this is a move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the victim, facing in the opposite direction, and reaches around the victim's torso with one arm across the victim's chest with his/her hand holding onto his/her other hand which is behind the opponent's head. The wrestler then falls backward, diving the victim into the mat face-first.

WWE wrestler Edge used to perform a variation of this move, where he would cross his leg behind the opponents leg, forcing them to fall with a greater velocity, calling it the Downward Spiral.

A variation is to hook the leg similar to a Russian legsweep, which was popularized as the Flatliner, by Chris Kanyon.

It is also currently used by WWE superstars Muhammad Hassan and Orlando Jordan as a finisher. Alex Shelley also uses a spinning variation as one of his finishers.

Wheelbarrow facebuster

Also called a Reverse Powerbomb. The attacker grabs a standing victim around the waist from behind and lifts him/her in the air. The attacker then falls to a sitting position, swinging the victim down so that their face is driven into the mat.

This move can also see the wrestler hook both an opponent's the arms in a double chickenwing to aid in lifting him up into the air before dropping the victim into a sit-out faceplant position. This Sit-out Chickenwing Facebuster is often refered to as a Waffle Face.

Argentine Facebuster

The attacker places the victim in an Argentine backbreaker rack and falls sideways, still holding the victims head with one arm while flipping the victim over with the other, driving them down to the mat face-first.

Among the wrestlers who have used this move are CIMA and Curry Man.

Flapjack

A flapjack is any move that throws the victim so that he/she is pushed upward and therefore having he/she fall on his/her front. The basic flapjack is similar to a back drop, but the wrestler pushes upwards so that the victim falls onto his/her face instead of falling back-first.

A Hotshot is refered to when a flapjack is performed so that the victim would fall across the ring ropes.

Alley Oop

This is a flapjack where the victim is lifted on to the attacker's he/she flies over the attacker's head and land front-first on the mat.

It was made famous by Tori and then The Big Show.

Gutbuster

A Gutbuster is any move in which the wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and jumps or drops him/her so that the victim's stomach impacts against part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee.

Gutbuster Drop

A move in which a wrestler lifts an opponent up on to his/her shoulder and drops down to his/her knee droping the opponent's stomach on the wrestler's shoulder.

Rib breaker

Also called a stomach breaker it is essentially the same as a back breaker but with the victim facing the opposite direction, it involves lifting the opponent up and dropping him/her stomach-first against the wrestler's knee.

Headscissors takedown

With the attacker's legs scissored around the opponent's head, the attacker performs a backflip, dragging the victim into a forced somersault that distances the attacker from the victim and lands the opponent on his/her back. Is also performed when a wrestler runs to the side of an opponent spin up on to his/her shoulders while scissoring his/her legs around his/her head as he/she continues to spin throwing the opponent to the mat.

Hurricanrana

The correct name for this maneuver is the Huracanrana/Huracarrana but it is commonly misspelled in English as Hurricanrana, this is a headscissors takedown that ends in a rana pinning hold. The Rana is any double-leg cradle (or the ending of a Sunset Flip) The Huracanrana is typically done with more velocity than the headscissors takedown, as the victim needs to land directly underneath the attacker, instead of being tossed away. Luchador Huracán Ramírez invented the maneuver. This move can be thought of as an inverted version of a victory roll.

It is often confused with the more impactful non-pinning headscissor variation known as a Frankensteiner, although the difference is similar to seeing a bridged suplex compared to a released one etc.

Hip Toss

The attacker stands next to the victim with both facing the same direction, and the attacker hooks his/her arm underneath and behind the victim's closest armpit.

The attacker then quickly lifts the victim up with that arm and throws the victim forward, which would lead the attacker to flip the victim onto his/her back to end the move.

Irish Whip

Also called a hammer throw. A move in which the wrestler grabs one of his/her opponent's arms and spins, swinging the victim into an obstacle such as the ring ropes, a turnbuckle, or the stairs leading into the ring. One popular use of the irish whip is to try to "hit for the cycle" by whipping one's opponent into each corner in turn. An Irish whip into the ring ropes is usually used to set the victim up for another technique as he/she bounces off, such as a suplex or clothesline.

Jawbreaker

Missing image
StoneColdStunnerPiper.jpg
The Stone Cold Stunner to Roddy Piper

A jawbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's jaw against a part of the wrestler's body, usually his/her knee, head or shoulder.

A standard jawbreaker is seen when an attacker (either stands facing or not facing victim) places his/her head under the jaw of the victim and holds the victim in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the victim into the to of his/her head.

Three-quarter Facelock Jawbreaker

This is a move that mostly sees an attacker applying a Three-quarter Facelock then sees the wrestler fall to a sitting position dropping the opponent's jaw across his/her shoulder.

This was made famous by Stone Cold Steve Austin who referred to it as a Stone Cold Stunner. The name Stunner is widely used when referring to this move.

Rolling Three-quarter Facelock Jawbreaker

This is when a Inverted facelock is rolled in to a Three-quarter Facelock that ends in the seated (Stone Cold) stunner position, the most famous version of a three-quarter facelock jawbreaker is know as the Whipper-snapper and is proformed by Mikey Whipwreck of ECW fame.

Shoulder Jawbreaker

The attacker stands facing the victim, places his/her shoulder under the jaw of the victim and holds the victim in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the victim into his/her shoulder. This move was used by Shane Douglas in WCW, and was named the Franchiser.

Mat slam

A matslam is any move in which the wrestler forces the back of the opponent's head into the mat which does not involve a headlock or Facelock. If these are used then the move is considered a type of DDT (if the attacker falls backwards) or bulldog.

A standard Mat Slam involves the attacker grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and pulling back, forcing the back of the opponent's head into the mat.

Inverted mat slam

Inverted Mat Slams are commonly referred to as facebusters.

Sleeper slam

The attacker applies a sleeper hold to the victim, then falls face first to the ground, pulling the victim down with them and driving the back and head of the victim into the ground. Billy Gunn used a modified version of this move where he lifted the victim before falling, which he called The One and Only.

Neckbreaker

There are two general categories of neckbreaker, which are related only in that they attack the victim's neck.

One category of neckbreaker is the type of move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's neck against a part of the wrestler's body, usually his/her knee, head or shoulder.

Shoulder Neckbreaker

From a back-to-back position, the wrestler reaches back and pulls his/her opponent's head over his shoulder, then drops, causing the back of the victim's neck to hit the shoulder. This was the late Rick Rude's finishing move, which he called "The Rude Awakening." Another version of this, known as a Hangman's Neckbreaker, involves the wrestler placing the victim's head not on the shoulder but above their own head for the drop.

Elevated Cradle Neckbreaker

The wrestler holds his/her opponent upside-down with the back of the victim's neck against his/her shoulder and with both legs hooked, and drops to a kneeling or sitting position so that the victim's neck hits against the shoulder. It is usually performed against a victim who is sitting on the top turnbuckle and facing the attacker.

Notable users include: Ron Killings.

Inverted Facelock Neckbreaker

Also known as a Inverted Facelock Backbreaker is a move in which an attacker places the victim in an inverted facelock. The attacker then drops to one knee while maintaining the hold, bending their other knee in the process and driving the back of the victim's neck and upper spine down on to the bent knee.

Neckbreaker Slam

A neckbreaker slam is any technique in which the attacker throws his/her opponent to the ground by twisting the victim's neck. also a back head slam.

This can also refer to a Dropping Neckbreaker, when a wrestler drops to the mat while holding an opponent by their neck, without having to twist it.

Argentine neckbreaker

The attacker lifts the victim up so that they are laying across the attacker's shoulders and hooks the victim's neck and leg. The attacker releases the victim's legs and pushes the victim's body so that it swings out straight behind the attacker's body. As the victim's body is moving out, the attacker keeps hold to the victim's neck and falls down, executing a dropping neckbreaker.

Inverted Neckbreaker

see Three-quarter Facelock Bulldog

Overdrive

With the opponent hunched over, the attacker hooks his/her inside leg over the opponent's head, grabbing the arm closest to them. The attacker leans back before throwing himself/herself forward, landing on his/her hands and knees as the opponent is spun around, his/her neck landing on the inside of the opponent's knee.

Notable users include: Randy Orton, Elix Skipper (Play of the Day), and Carlito Caribbean Cool (Cool-Breaker)

Swinging Neckbreaker

The attacker applies a front facelock and grabs hold of the victim's right hand with his/her left hand. The attacker then swings himself/herself to the ground, in a semi-circular motion, so that both the attacker and the victim fall to the ground back-first.

Neckbreaker Drop

A neckbreaker drop is a clothesline that ends almost like an upsidedown bulldog. Matt Hardy uses a lariat (wrapping clothesline) version that ends in an inverted bulldog-like position and calls it the Side Effect. The running version is extremely popular and also called the Necktie Clothesline, Bulldog Lariat and the Hart Attack.

Whiplash

The attacker faces a standing victim with one side of the ring immediately behind the victim. The attacker applies a front facelock to the victim, takes hold of the victim with his/her free hand, then lifts the victim until he/she is nearly vertical. The attacker then moves forward so that the victim's legs are placed on the top ring rope, and this point the attacker twists on the neck and quickly throws himself to the ground, the momentum of this lifts the victim off the rope driving the neck and shoulders of the victim into the ground.

There is also a double team version of this move.

Piledriver

A piledriver is any move in which the wrestler grabs his/her opponent, turns him/her upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the victim's head into the mat.

Powerbomb

Main article: Powerbomb

A powerbomb is a move in which a victim is lifted up (usally so that he/she is sitting on the attacker's shoulders) then slammed down back-first to the mat.

The standard Powerbomb sees a wrestler placed in a standing headscissors position (bent forward with his/her head placed between the attacker's thighs) then lifted up on the attacker's shoulders, then slammed down back-first to the mat.

The very first ever power bomb, was allegedly performed by Lou Thesz accidentally when he badly botched a piledriver.

Powerslam

A powerslam is any slam in which the wrestler performing the technique falls face-down on top of his/her opponent.

Emerald Frosion

This is a sitout side powerslam in which the attacker lifts the victim up on his right shoulder like in a Front powerslam. The attacker wraps his right arm around the victim's neck, and the left arm around the victim's torso. The attacker then sits down while flipping the victim forward to the right side of him/her, driving the victim neck and shoulder first into the mat.

Notable users include: Mitsuharu Misawa (who gave it its name) and Samoa Joe (Island Driver).

Falling slam

Facing his/her opponent, the wrestler reaches between his/her opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around his/her back from the same side with his/her other arm. The wrestler lifts his/her opponent up so he/she are horizontal across the wrestler's body then falls forward to slam the victim against the mat back-first. Also known as a Reverse Fallaway Slam.

Front powerslam

The attacker reaches between the victim's legs with one arm and reaches around the victim's back from the same side with his/her other arm. The wrestler lifts his/her victim up over his/her shoulder and falls forward to slam the victim against the mat back-first. Wrestlers sometimes run forward as they slam—this is called a Running Powerslam, and was made famous by The British Bulldog.

Inverted front powerslam

See Inverted powerbomb.

Gorilla press powerslam

Similar to a gorilla press slam. The wrestler lifts his/her opponent up over his/her head with arms fully extended (as in the military press used in weight lifting), then drops his/her opponent up over his/her shoulder and falls forward to slam the victim against the mat back-first. Johnny Stamboli used this as finisher which he dubbed the Fuhgetaboutit when he worked in WWE.

Inverted sitout side powerslam

The attacker faces a bent opponent. He then gutwrenches the opponent and lifts him up on one of his shoulders, facing upwards. The attacker then sits down and simultaneously flips the opponent forwards, slamming them down to the mat face first next to the attacker.

Notable users include: John Walters (Hurricane DDT) and Masato Tanaka (Complete Dust)

Powerslam pin

The attacker places one arm between the victim's legs and reaches over the victim's shoulder with his/her other arm. The wrestler then spins the victim over onto his/her back, keeping the victim horizontal across his/her body as he/she falls face-down on top of the victim in a pinning position. This move is usually performed on a charging opponent, using the victim's own momentum to power the throw.

Suplex powerslam

The attacker applies a Front face lock, throws his/her near arm over his/her shoulder, and then grabs his/her tights to lift him/her up straight in the air (as in most standard suplexes). When the wrestler begins to drop the victim to the mat the wrestler will fall face-down on top of his/her opponent (in a powerslam position).

This move was invented by Dean Malenko, and popularized by Bill Goldberg, who called it "The Jackhammer".

Another version of this move sees a wrestler use the standard vertical suplex to lift the opponent into the air and place him/her over the attacker's shoulder before proforming a running powerslam.

Side slam

The wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the victim, facing in the opposite direction, and reaches around the victim's torso with one arm across the victim's chest and under both arms. The wrestler lifts him/her up with one arm and falls forward, slamming the victim into the mat back-first. The side slam is frequently referred to by its Japanese name of Ura-nage and is frequently performed against a charging opponent, similar to a low clothesline.

It has been used as a finisher by many wrestlers, including The Big Boss Man, who called it the Bossman Slam, The Rock, who calls it the Rock Bottom, and Booker T, who calls it the Book End.

More variations:

Elevated side slam

In this variation the opponent is first lifted into the air in a belly-to-back suplex motion before it is turned into a side slam so the victim is dropped from an elevated position. This version is used by Mark Jindrak, who calls it "The Mark of Excellence".This is also used by John Cena.

Another elevated side slam starts with the attacker applying a front face lock to his/her opponent and draping the victim's near arm over his/her shoulder, then lifting him/her up and holding the opponent in the vertical postion, at this point the face lock is released and as the victim falls back down, his/she is placed into a side slam position and dropped to the mat. This version is used by Matt Morgan.

Moonsault Ura-nage

The attacker stands slightly behind and facing the side of a standing victim. The attacker then reaches under the near arm of the victim, across the chest of the victim and under their far arm, while placing his/her other hand on the back of the victim to hold them in place. The attacker then performs a backwards somersault while holding the victim, driving the victim into the ground back-first.

This move can also be performed off the top rope and is known as a Solo Spanish Fly in reference to the double team move.

Spinning side slam

The wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the victim, facing in the opposite direction, and reaches around the victim's torso with one arm across the victim's chest and under both arms. The wrestler then lifts him/her up with one arm as he/she swings the victim 180° to the opposite side, while the wrestler faces the same direction, then falls onto the opponent slamming the victim onto the mat back-first.

In another version of this move, which is performed against a charging opponent, the wrestler uses the victim's own momentum to power the throw and can can see the wrestler with the victim in the air spinning back round nearly 360° before droping him to the mat. This version is currently being used by Abyss who calls it the Black Hole Slam and a modified version has also been used recently by Heidenreich.

Swinging side slam

Facing his opponent, the wrestler reaches between his/her opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around his/her back from the same side with his/her other arm. The wrestler lifts his/her opponent up so he/she is horizontal across the wrestler's body then the attacker swings the lower half of the victim's body out and round until one arm is across the victim's chest and under both arms. The wrestler falls forward, slamming the victim into the mat back-first. Chris Harris also uses this move in which he calls the Catatonic. Billy Gunn uses this move and he calls is the Gunn Slinger.

Sidewalk slam

The wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the victim, facing in the same direction, and reaches around the victim's torso with one arm across the victim's chest and under both arms and places the other arm under the victim's legs. The wrestler then lifts him/her up, bringing his/her legs off the ground and falls down to the mat in a sitting position, slamming the victim into the mat back-first. It was formerly used by the late Big Boss Man.

Shoulderbreaker

A shoulderbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's shoulder against any part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee.

This move would usually see the attacker turn the victim upside-down and drop the victim shoulder-first on the attacker's knee.

It was used by Don Muraco as a finishing move.

Snake Eyes

This move would see the attacker to place the victim on top of the attacker's shoulder so that both are facing the same direction while the victim is facing forward, and then the attacker would throw the victim face-first onto a turnbuckle.

Steve Austin used this move as his finisher in ECW, calling it the Stun Gun.

This move is also commonly used by The Undertaker and Kevin Nash.

Snapmare

With the attacker's back to the victim the attacker applies a cravatte or a 3/4 facelock then kneels down and snaps the victim over his/her shoulder so the victim lands back-first on the mat.

This is often done as a set-up move for any submission hold that requires the attacker to stand behind the victim.

Suplex

Main article: Suplex

A suplex is the same as the amateur suplay, a throw which involves arching/bridging either overhead or twisting to the side, so the opponent is slammed to the mat back-first. The term suplex (without qualifiers) can also refer specifically to the vertical suplex.

Trips/Sweeps

Dragon Screw

This is a legwhip where and attacker grabs an opponent's leg and holds it horizontal to the mat while they are facing each other, beofore spinning it toward the inside of the opponent's leg, bringing them down in a turning motion.

Drop Toe-hold

The attacker falls to the ground, placing one foot at the front of the opponent's ankle and the other in the back of the shin. This causes the victim to fall face first into the ground. It is sometimes used illegaly to force an opponent into a chair or other elevated weapon; it is also used occasionally to force an opponent face-first into the turnbuckles, stunning him/her or her momentarily.

It is used by Rey Mysterio into the second rope as a set-up to his 619 finisher.

Half Nelson Legsweep

The attacker stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the victim. The attacker reaches under one of the victim's arms with his/her corresponding arm and places the palm of his/her hand on the neck of the victim, thereby forcing the arm of the victim up into the air (the Half Nelson). The attacker then uses his/her other arm to pull the victim's other arm behind the victim's head, so both victim's arms are pinned. The attacker then hooks the victim's near leg and throws themselves backwards, driving the victim back-first to the ground.

Russian legsweep

Also known as a Side Suplex or a Side Russian Legsweep a move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the victim, facing in the same direction, and reaches behind the victim's back to hook the opponents head with the other hand extending the victims nearest arm, then while hooking the opponents leg the wrestler falls backward, pulling the victim to the mat back-first.

There is also a facebuster variation of this move.

Straight Jacket

Another variation of a Russian Leg-sweep, except the opponent's arms are crossed over the victim's chest.

Schoolboy

The attacker drops down to his/her knees behind the opponent and forces his/her bodyweight forward to force the opponent to fall flat on his/her face. This technique gives its name to the schoolboy bump.

STO

The STO (Space Tornado Ogawa) is a sweep in which an attacker wraps one arm across the chest of his/her opponent and sweeps the opponent's legs with his/her own leg to slam the other wrestler back-first. This can also be a lariat-legsweep combination to slam down opponent. Same as the judo sweep O-soto-gari. (Naoya Ogawa, the one who adapted the move into pro wrestling, is a former Olympic judoka). Today the move is utilized as a signature move (from a run) by independent wrestler Rufio Rush and Steve Corino.

Claw-hold STO

Also known as an STK, this move is a STO where the attacker would first apply a head claw with one hand before sweeping his/her opponent's legs to slam down the victim's head on the mat. This move is used by Kenzo Suzuki as his finisher.

Reverse STO

See Complete Shot

Set up move

These are transition moves that set up for various throws and slams. See Transition holds

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