Porsche 928

From Academic Kids

Missing image
928.JPG
1995 Porsche 928

The Porsche 928 is an automobile made by Porsche AG of Germany from 1977 to 1995, during which time it was their flagship model. It is classified as a grand tourer, but the combination of its V8 engine and 50/50 weight distribution made it a competent sports car. It was designed to replace the Porsche 911, although ultimately it failed.

The 928 has been nicknamed Shark and Land Shark, due both to its shark-like appearance with its headlights down, and its ability to 'eat up' large segments of road, in very little time.

Contents

Conception

The 928 design study began in 1971 and the finished car debuted at the 1977 Geneva Motor Show before going on sale. Porsche had wanted to add a luxury touring car to their line-up, and slumping sales of the 911 model led executives to believe that they would soon need a replacement for it. They intended for the 928 to cover both bases. It was voted European Car of the Year in 1978.

Porsche's Managing Director at the time, Ernst Fuhrmann, believed that the company's future lay with practical grand tourers rather than with pure sports cars, partly because he had seen the 911 sales slip so greatly. When Peter Schutz took over from Fuhrmann in January, 1981, he decided that the two models should be sold side by side, feeling the company should wait for the consumers to pick a favorite. Although the 928 developed an avid fan following, it never sold in the numbers that Fuhrmann had originally predicted, and was discontinued in 1995. The 911 remains Porsche's most recognized model.

Design

The 928 featured a large, front-mounted and water-cooled, V8 engine driving the rear wheels. Originally displacing 4.5 litres and featuring a single overhead camshaft, it produced 219 hp (163 kW) for the North American market and 234 hp (174 kW) in other markets. Porsche upgraded the engine from mechanical to electronic fuel injection in 1980, although power remained the same. This design marked a major change in direction for Porsche, whose cars had until then had used only rear-or mid-mounted air-cooled flat engines with four or six cylinders.

Porsche utilized a transaxle gearbox in the 928 to help achieve 50/50 front/rear weight distribution, aiding the car's balance even though it weighed much more than the 911. It came with either a five-speed dog leg manual transmission, or a Mercedes-Benz derived four-speed automatic transmission. Most American cars were specified with the automatic transmission.

The body, styled by Anatole Lapine, was mainly steel, but the doors, front wings and bonnet were aluminium. It had a substantial luggage area accessed via a large hatchback. The bumpers (fenders) were integrated into the nose and tail and covered in body coloured plastic; an unusual feature for the time that aided the car visually and reduced its drag. Porsche opted not to offer a convertible variant but many aftermarket modifiers offer convertible conversions.

The 928 qualified as a 2+2, having two small seats in the rear. Both seats could be folded down to enlarge the luggage area, and both had sun visors. The instrument binnacle moved with the adjustable steering wheel.

The design of the 928 included innovations such as the Weissach Axle that provides passive rear wheel steering in certain off throttle cornering situations, and an un-sleeved, silicon alloy engine block, which reduced weight and provided a highly durable cylinder bore.

Later variants

Porsche introduced their first revision of the 928, the 928S in 1980 in Europe, although it was 1983 before the car reached North America. The main change for the 928S was under the hood, where a revised 4.7 litre engine was used. European versions debuted with 300 hp (224 kW), and were upgraded to 310 hp (231 kW) in 1983. North American spec models needed additional emissions regulation equipment, and were limited to 234 hp (174 kW) as a result. Externally, the S wore front and rear spoilers and sported wider wheels and tires than the previous version.

Porsche updated the North American 928S in 1984, replacing the 4.7 litre, single overhead camshaft engine with a new 5.0 litre, double overhead camshaft engine sporting four valves per cylinder. Power rose to 288 hp, but European models, which kept the 4.7 litre engine, were still producing 310 hp (231 kW). The 928S remained in the line-up for two more years before it was replaced in 1986 by the 928 S4.

The first truly major update for the 928, the S4 sported an updated version of the 5.0 litre V8 for both the European and American markets producing 316 hp, regardless of where it was purchased. Larger brakes with 4-piston calipers, a dual-disc clutch and revised styling helped round out the major changes, although suspension revisions were also made, in addition to a slight freshening of the interior. Porsche kept the S4 in production through 1991, although they debuted a more expensive version, the GT, in 1989. Featuring an even tighter suspension, a computer controlled limited slip differential (much like the one from the 959), and offered only with a 5-speed transmission, the GT was the most aggressive 928 yet. Power in the GT rose to 326 hp (243 kW).

The S4 and GT variants were both cut in 1991, making way for the greatest and ultimately final version of the 928, the GTS. The GTS debuted in 1992 with even smoother bodywork, an updated interior, larger brakes, a revised suspension and more power from an enlarged 5.4 litre motor, 345 in total. Loaded GTS models could eclipse $80,000 USD in 1995, making them among the most expensive cars on the road. Porsche discontinued the GTS model in 1995. Only 95 cars were produced in the 928's final year of production. The 928 was never able to eclipse sales of the 911.

Used 928s have largely fallen in value, the result of somewhat odd styling and high maintenance costs. The 1992 to 1995 GTS, however, has retained very high value and is regarded by some as a prize. A great community dedicated to the 928 exists online even today, and the car has won a huge fan base.

With the release of the Porsche Cayenne sports utility vehicle, Porsche has met with renewed success with a front-engine, V8 powered model. Rumours and considerable fan speculation have given some owners hope that the new V8 motor will power a reborn 928, although the prospect seems unlikely.

The three major changes in styling

The 928's styling developments can largely be summed up with the following characteristics:

Styling was the same from 1977 through 1980 and the body lacked both front and rear spoilers. From 1980 (1983 in North America) through 1986, front and rear spoilers were present (on "S" models), rear spoilers were integrated into the hatch. From 1987 through 1995, the front spoiler is integrated into the nose and the rear spoiler became a separated wing rather than an integrated piece, the rear tail-light configuration was also different from previous versions.

Another easily noticeable visual difference between versions is the style of the rims. Early 928s had "phone dial" rims, while mid-production 928s had slotted rims, and late model 928s had "GT" style rims.

928 evolution

The evolution of the 928 during its 18 years of production is quite subtle, and often confuses individuals interested in purchasing a 928. The tables below show the major differences, which were largely made to the nose, tail, interior, engine, & rims.

Images & information detailing the evolution through the Model Years:


1977

  • Model designation: 928
  • Engine displacement: 4.5 L
  • Valves: 16
  • Power: 219 hp (163 kW) North America/239 Europe
  • Improvements:

1978

  • Model designation: 928
  • Engine displacement: 4.5 L
  • Valves: 16
  • Power: 219 hp (163 kW) North America /239 Europe
  • Improvements:

1979

  • Model designation: 928
  • Engine displacement: 4.5 L
  • Valves: 16
  • Power: 219 hp (163 kW) North America/239 Europe
  • Improvements:

1980 928North America/928S Europe

  • Model designation: 928 North America/928S Europe
  • Engine displacement: 4.5 L/4.7 L (S)
  • Valves: 16
  • Power: 219 hp (163 kW) North America/300 Europe
  • Improvements: Front & rear Spoilers added on S Models.

1981

  • Model designation: 928 North America/928S Europe
  • Engine displacement: 4.5 L/4.7 L (S)
  • Valves: 16
  • Power: 219 hp (163 kW) North America/300 Europe
  • Improvements:

1982

  • Model designation: 928 North America/928S Europe
  • Engine displacement: 4.5 L/4.7 L (S)
  • Valves: 16
  • Power: 219 hp (163 kW) North America/300 Europe
  • Improvements:

1983

  • Model designation: 928S
  • Weight:3200 lb (1451 kg)
  • Engine displacement: 4.7 L
  • Valves: 16
  • Power:234 hp (174 kW) @ 5200 rpm North America/310 hp (231 kW) Europe
  • Improvements:

1984

  • Model designation: 928S
  • Weight:3200 (1451 kg)
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L North America/4.7 L Europe
  • Valves: 32 North America/16 Europe
  • Power: 288 hp (215 kW) North America/310 hp (231 kW) Europe
  • Improvements:

1985

  • Model designation: 928S
  • Weight:3500
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L North America/4.7 L Europe
  • Valves: 32 North America/16 Europe
  • Power: 288 hp (215 kW) North America/310 hp (231 kW) Europe
  • Improvements:

1986

  • Model designation: 928S
  • Weight:3500
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L North America/4.7 L Europe
  • Valves: 32 North America/16 Europe
  • Power: 288 hp (215 kW) North America/310 hp (231 kW) Europe
  • Improvements: "S4" variant replaces "S" mid-year.

1986.5

  • Model designation: 928 S4
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 315
  • Improvements: 5.0 litre, 315 hp V8 becomes "world engine", brakes are enlarged, interior revised, suspension retuned

1987

  • Model designation: 928 S4
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 315
  • Improvements: Integrated front & rear wing spoilers appear on the bodywork

1988

  • Model designation: 928 S4
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 315
  • Improvements:

1989

  • Model designation: 928 S4/928GT
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 315 (S4)/326 (GT)
  • Improvements: GT model debuts as a more expensive version, GT produces 326 horsepower (243 kW) and a computer controlled LSD system called PSD

1990

  • Model designation: 928 S4/928GT
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 315 (S4)/326 (GT)
  • Improvements:

1991

  • Model designation: 928 S4/928GT
  • Engine displacement: 5.0 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 315 (S4)/326 (GT)
  • Improvements: Last year for S4 and GT variants in Europe

1992

  • Model designation: 928GTS
  • Engine displacement: 5.4 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 345
  • Improvements: The GTS improves upon the previous GT with better suspension and even larger brakes, PSD becomes standard and the engine grows to 5.4 litre, 345 hp. Bodywork is updated with flared rear fenders. GTS not available in USA in '92 model year

1993


  • Model designation: 928GTS
  • Engine displacement: 5.4 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 345
  • Improvements: none, but GTS is launched in USA

1994

  • Model designation: 928GTS
  • Engine displacement: 5.4 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 345
  • Improvements: Tire pressure sensors deleted, cabin air filer added, new 911 turbo (twist) wheels

1995

  • Model designation: 928GTS
  • Engine displacement: 5.4 L
  • Valves: 32
  • Power: 345
  • Improvements: no changes

Miscellaneous

It can be seen in many movies, including Scarface, Risky Business, Weird Science, Beetlejuice, Thinner, Nutty Professor and Cannonball Run. There is an AC/DC video "Let There Be Rock" with the band racing a biplane in a then-new 1980 928, and more recently a white 928 appears in the opening sequence of Britney Spears' "My Prerogative" video.

There are many famous celebrities associated with the 928, including Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Eddie Murphy, David Letterman, and MC Hammer.

On August 7, 1986, the Porsche 928 was graced with the distinction of being the World's Fastest Production Car, earning the Land Speed Record at the Bonneville Salt Flats.

References

ja:ポルシェ_928

Navigation

Academic Kids Menu

  • Art and Cultures
    • Art (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Art)
    • Architecture (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Architecture)
    • Cultures (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Cultures)
    • Music (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Music)
    • Musical Instruments (http://academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/List_of_musical_instruments)
  • Biographies (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Biographies)
  • Clipart (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Clipart)
  • Geography (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Geography)
    • Countries of the World (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Countries)
    • Maps (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Maps)
    • Flags (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Flags)
    • Continents (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Continents)
  • History (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/History)
    • Ancient Civilizations (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Ancient_Civilizations)
    • Industrial Revolution (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Industrial_Revolution)
    • Middle Ages (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Middle_Ages)
    • Prehistory (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Prehistory)
    • Renaissance (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Renaissance)
    • Timelines (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Timelines)
    • United States (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/United_States)
    • Wars (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Wars)
    • World History (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/History_of_the_world)
  • Human Body (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Human_Body)
  • Mathematics (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Mathematics)
  • Reference (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Reference)
  • Science (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Science)
    • Animals (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Animals)
    • Aviation (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Aviation)
    • Dinosaurs (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Dinosaurs)
    • Earth (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Earth)
    • Inventions (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Inventions)
    • Physical Science (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Physical_Science)
    • Plants (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Plants)
    • Scientists (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Scientists)
  • Social Studies (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Social_Studies)
    • Anthropology (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Anthropology)
    • Economics (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Economics)
    • Government (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Government)
    • Religion (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Religion)
    • Holidays (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Holidays)
  • Space and Astronomy
    • Solar System (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Solar_System)
    • Planets (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Planets)
  • Sports (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Sports)
  • Timelines (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Timelines)
  • Weather (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Weather)
  • US States (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/US_States)

Information

  • Home Page (http://academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php)
  • Contact Us (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Contactus)

  • Clip Art (http://classroomclipart.com)
Toolbox
Personal tools